Gallery

Thanks to a lovely client we indulged in the perfect builders afternoon tea break treat, as always the conversation revolved around what goes on first…. Jam or cream…

Covering a building to protect against the elements is often quite expensive but on longer projects it is the best way to ensure that work continues all year round. Working undercover like this also really helps improve the finished quality of the work, and that’s something we all appreciate.

Chimney before…. (note the snow!)

And after…. (all be it as viewed from the other side)

Swepped Valleys

A clay tile valley laid as a “swepped Valley” below is a close up showing the basic layout. Note the alternate courses of 6 cut tiles followed by 7 cut tiles.

As can be seen on swepped valleys the side and head lap does not meet industry standards, and therefore it is necessary to incorporate a soaker to each course, this would be best cut from sheet lead or zinc.

Just about finished… note the lead soakers used to weather the intersection of the valley, gable end and lower roof slope.

With the Reed thatch it’s all done… what’s not to like…

As I prepare this for the website I can’t help but feel pretty pleased by what we had done… a self-indulgent proud moment…
When we get a client that is willing to undertake work of this nature it gives us the chance to show what we can do, the swepped valley was time consuming and expensive but as can be seen well worth it… Thank you Tommy and Julie…

Tilers top tip!

Ok here is the problem… It’s a conservation job and as such there is no chance of using tile and a half on the verge. The overhang is about 2”or thereabouts and so the cut tile has almost no support from the batten and there is no under cloak as you are matching in with the original design. So take a look at this, by cutting the tiles as shown the problem fades away, the half tile is now resting on the batten and is far better supported…
roof tilers surrey

I give this idea to you all you roofing chaps and lasses out there, feel free to copy it claim it as your own if you wish but give it a try… Enjoy!

Before we started its fair to say this lean to had seen better days!

We have made a start, the stone has been repointed in lime mortar and the gable ends are nearing completion.

Ready for the roof tiling…

Almost watertight…

roof tilers surrey

Verge and eves detail, neat and tidy, just the way we like it…

Thatching

Working with other trades is always nice and gives us the chance to learn new skills and understand crafts we wouldn’t normally encounter. Here are a few pics of a thatching project we were part of…
 

 

The use of metal brackets to strengthen timber structures is a proven conservation technique and one we have used many times.

A newly built lime and stone panel, clay peg tiling and soaker abutment with valley boards above ready to take a swepped tiled valley and thatch roof…. For me that adds up to exciting times and lots to look forward to…

 

The old chimney had completely failed and was allowing water to penetrate, so we demolished it, cleaned up the bricks and rebuilt it with a new lead tray at the base to prevent damp.

Another chimney, but this time we used new bricks, note the neat and tidy leadwork…. Our signature!

 

Happiness is: … a favourite chisel and a job to use it on…

Making these things doesn’t even feel like work…

Note the flush fitting hinges!

surrey door fittersThe new door is now ready to be used for the first time…

 

A new stone window frame ready for installation.

Just waiting for the new glass…

Lattice window intalled into stone frame

 

Historic Joinery and Brickwork